Garnisons Kirkegård

Garnison Kirkegård (English: Garnison Cemetery) and Soldiers Cemetery is located on Dag Hammerskjölds Allé close to the center of Copenhagen, Denmark.

Garnison Cemetery was designated by decree of King Frederik the 3rd as a cemetery in 1664. The official inauguration was made later – on July 13 1671. The cemetery was originally called “Soldiers cemetery” and it was indeed soldiers who were buried here.

In 1706 the Garnison Church was built at the current Sct. Annæ Place, and in 1723 the “Soldiers cemetery” changed its name to the current name, Garnison Cemetery.

In 1711 – during the great plague epidemic – it was determined that civilians could also be buried in the cemetery because it was difficult to find space around the churches in the city.



Many of the old graves are still family-owned. In addition there are warrior monuments to the fallen in the wars 1848 – 1850 and 1864. Garnison Cemetery is an independent, parochial church council-run cemetery subject to the Army’s highest authority.

Garnison Cemetery is “a beautiful garden.” Its walkways and paths – sometimes crooked – some bright and friendly, others dark and solemn, fill the visitor with beauty. The cemetery creates a sense of belonging to the country’s military history.

However, the history of the cemetery is not just military. Many well known cultural persons like Royal Theater manager FC Holstein (1853) and actor Christian Niemann Rosenkilde (1861) have found their final resting place at the Garnison Cemetery.

More about Copenhagen here.